Historical analysis of college campus interracial dating

By 1910, 28 states prohibited certain forms of interracial marriage.

Eight states including Arizona, California, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, and Utah extended their prohibitions to include people of Asian descent.

The study also observed a clear gender divide in racial preference with regards to marriage: Women of all the races which were studied revealed a strong preference for men of their own race for marriage, with the caveat that East Asian women only discriminated against Black and Hispanic men, and not against White men.

Several studies have found that a factor which significantly affects an individual's choices with regards to marriage is socio-economic status ("SES")—the measure of a person's income, education, social class, profession, etc.

White husband, white wife pairings are used as a control.

This data comes from Table 3 Model 4 of the Zhang paper, which incorporates all controls into the model.

S.-born Asian Pacific American women took White husbands during the year of publication.

Anti-miscegenation laws discouraging marriages between Whites and non-Whites were affecting Asian immigrants and their spouses from the late 17th to early 20th century.

This ranking scheme illustrates the manner in which the barriers against desegregation fell: Of less importance was the segregation in basic public facilities, which was abolished with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down in 1967 by the Supreme Court ruling in the landmark Loving v. Social enterprise research conducted on behalf of the Columbia Business School (2005–2007) showed that regional differences within the United States in how interracial relationships are perceived have persisted: Daters of both sexes from south of the Mason–Dixon line were found to have much stronger same-race preferences than northern daters did.

Search for historical analysis of college campus interracial dating:

historical analysis of college campus interracial dating-30

Gurung & Duong (1999) compiled a study relating to mixed-ethnic relationships ("MER"s) and same-ethnic relationships ("SER"s), concluding that individuals part of "MER"s generally do not view themselves differently from same-ethnic couples.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “historical analysis of college campus interracial dating”

  1. worthy subs may submit their fantasies for my perusal. O:) I am looking for men or women close to my age, 23-36, to have some fun with. I may have my dominant streak, but I usually love someone who can take charge in bed. My Ideal Person: Good looking fit people who are honest, genuine, clean and sincere. The most complaint we get from married women in Alabama, AL was lack of sex in the marriage.